Category Archives for Productivity

How to Deal With Pre-assigned Project Resources

Life is not easy. We are dealt hands that can be difficult. Project managers may be pre-assigned resources internally and externally that lack the skills and knowledge required for their projects.

How to Deal WithPre-assigned

Photo courtesy of DollarPhotoClub.com (edited in Canva)

Why do we always feel like we get the left-over resources?

What can we do? Jump ship. Give up. Find another job. Let’s try some other strategies.

  1. Negotiate. First, determine who assigns the resources? Is it a functional manager? Does your organization have a resource manager? Will a vendor or supplier provide resources? Second, meet to discuss the goals of your project and the knowledge and skills that will be required for success. Third, recommend resources for the team.
  2. Influence. What do we do if we work for a large organization where we do not have access to the individuals making the assignments? Someone has access to these people. Does your sponsor have access? Does your manager have the right connections. If so, influence the people you know and make your case. Ask your connections to influence the decision makers.
  3. Acquire outside resources. When your organization lacks staff to complete the required project activities, see if you can acquire outside resources. Here is one reason that project managers need to be involved in projects early. You can make your case and build the resource cost in your budget. Carefully interview potential candidates.
  4. Develop your teams. At the end of the day, you will be assigned teams. Guess what? The teams will not be perfect. What skills and competencies are lacking? Are the team members motivated? What do you need to do to improve overall project performance? Look for ways to improve knowledge and skills, create team building opportunities, build trust, and encourage collaboration.

The Insanity of Resource Management

Many organizations have under-performing projects. Why? Organizations do a poor job of defining their projects and understanding the resource requirements. Next, organizations overcommit – they commit to more projects than they should. Team members are stressed and organizations experience a lot of employee turnover. Furthermore, organizations fail to identify and acquire and develop skills and knowledge for these resource bottlenecks.

I am sometimes asked to take a look at organization’s resource problems and help them find solutions. My response? Before I come, prioritize your project portfolio and kill or postpone half of your active lower-priority projects. Do fewer projects better. Of course, very few organizations will do this…the insanity continues.

Question: Perhaps you feel different. What would you recommend to improve project resource management?

12 Sure-Fire Ways to Improve Project Risk Management

If you survey people involved in projects on the importance of risk management for achieving project objectives, a high percentage of the participants will say risk management is important or very important. I’ve seen survey results where 90% of the people thought risk management was important. So…why do few people employ and support risk management?

Photo courtesy of DollarPhotoClub.com (edited in Canva)

Photo courtesy of DollarPhotoClub.com (edited in Canva)

Many people have had a bad experience. Project managers have performed risk management poorly. Let’s look at several reasons why project risk management can become useless and what we can do to gain better project results through risk management.

  1. Failure to lead by example. In order for organizations to mature and benefit from risk management, leaders including sponsors and project managers must walk the talk. People resist change. Without a consistent example by those in authority, people will likely seize opportunities to revert to their former behaviors. What must we do? Lead by example.
  2. Failure to focus on the risks that matter. Some project managers start their programs and projects with gusto. They facilitate risk identification exercises that result in a boatload of risks. However, no one knows which risks matter…there is no evaluation and prioritization of risks. People become overwhelmed and take no action. Be sure to evaluate and prioritize risks.Continue reading

Five Things to Start and Five Things to Stop in Project Meetings

Project managers have a responsibility to ensure their project meetings are efficient and effective. Here are five things to start and five things to stop in meetings.

Photo courtesy of DollarPhoto.com

Photo courtesy of DollarPhoto.com

Five Things to Start:

  1. Start and end your meetings on time.
  2. Start your meetings by stating the purpose of the meeting.
  3. Start summarizing, validating, and capturing Risks, Action Items, Issues, and Decisions during your meetings as they surface.
  4. Start engaging your team members with well-thought-out questions.
  5. Start capturing off-topic items in your Parking Lot to be considered for future meetings.

Five Things to Stop:

  1. Stop letting people ramble on and on off topic (i.e., topic hopping).
  2. Stop having meetings with no agenda and stated purpose.
  3. Stop letting meetings go over time.
  4. Stop allowing ego-centric individuals dominate your meetings.
  5. Stop having meetings when things may be handled in a different manner.

Questions: What else would you start or stop in meetings?