How to Initiate a Project Steering Committee

Someone decided that it was a good idea to bring project management into your organization. Perhaps it was your CEO or operations manager or IT Director. But for some reason, it never took off. Project management has not been supported by your culture. Let's look at how to get things in flight with a project steering committee.

Project Steering Committee

What's the Current State?

Start with an evaluation. Here are some questions to aid you in discovering the deeper issues. Interview your stakeholders to get their feedback.

  • When your organization introduced to project management, what were the problems project management was to address? If the problems have not been addressed, what is it costing you right now?
  • What's working well?
  • What's not working?
  • How can we get more value from project management?

Initiate a Project Steering Committee

Sometimes, the person responsible for project management (e.g., PMO Director or Project Services Manager) fails to involve stakeholders in evaluating project management. This person makes changes in project management with little to no input from the people being impacted. A better approach is to get regular feedback through a Project Steering Committee.

The purpose of the committee is to improve process and results. The Steering Committee determines the required changes, how much change is needed, and how fast changes need to occur.

Who Should Comprise the Project Steering Committee?

It is best if an influential senior member of your organization sponsors the committee. The sponsor helps to establish the vision and ensures the commitment of resources. But this person doesn’t have to manage the committee.

The Steering Committee may be managed by the person responsible for project management, a person with the proper credentials and experience. The team should include representatives from different areas such as IT, project management, and business operations. Ideally, team members have had project management training and have project experience.

Team Size and Tenure

An optimal team size is six to eight people. Team members should serve no longer than a year. You may wish to implement a staggered rotation where you add a couple of new team members and drop a couple of team members periodically.

Meeting Frequency/Time

The Steering Committee may meet as often as desired—for example, monthly, quarterly, or twice per year.

Plan for Improvement

How should the team approach the evaluation and improvement? Determine the problems and define a plan for improvement.

  • Define the problem(s) to be addressed (e.g., requirements defects are being identified late in the projects or poor communication between projects).
  • Define the goals.
  • Describe how you will measure success (i.e., desired effects).
  • Define the scope of changes (e.g., risk management planning process).
  • Identify team members who will develop, implement, and test the changes.
  • Define the action plan and completion date.
  • Execute the plan.

Try executing the changes for one of your projects to test the improvements.

Reviewing the Results

Once the team has executed and tested the improvement plan, the team should report their findings to the Steering Committee. The team should recommend one of the following:

  • Make the change(s) for subsequent projects.
  • Do not make the change(s).
  • Test again with modifications.

Final Thoughts

Implementing project management in an organization is not an easy task. Why? Because people are resistant to change, particularly when individuals do not understand the reason for the changes. Be patient. Listen carefully. Evolve at a healthy pace, not too fast and not too slow. Your Steering Committee can provide the feedback necessary to guide your pace and maturation.  

 

Become a more effective project risk manager.